[•] Fujifilm GFX50S with Manfrotto 303SPH Panoramic Setup

AX3C4984

Items Required: Manfrotto Tripod, Manfrotto 303SPH Pano Head, Fujifilm Shutter Release Cable, Fujifilm GFX50S Camera with 32-64mm F4 Lens.

Set up with any camera with the Manfrotto 303SPH head is no easy feat but hopefully this write up can help steer you in the right direction to achieve optimal nodal point between the sensor and lens.

The panoramic head has three axis of directions to move the camera into position to find the nodal point.

To find this position will determine whether or not you will get a parallax error in the stitching of the multiple photographs you take to achieve a perfect panoramic .

The first thing to do attach camera quick release place and make sure it is square and tight to the bottom of the camera. Any little bit of movement can throw the setup out. And be mindful not to over tighten as you can thread the camera holding screw which will really mess up your day.

AX3C4985

Once attached to tripod and pano head rotate the camera so that the lens faces downwards towards the ground. On the lens you will see white marking lines these will help align the lens up with the centre of the tripod.

AX3C4990

Another trick is to rotate the entire pano head and look at the setup and see the the lens barrel rotates perfectly without any wobble.

Now that you have the basic horizontal alignment you must now find the nodal point. This can be found by looking through the viewfinder at two posts in front of you and as you rotate the lens see if the two posts especially the first post does not move out of position. (To understand this hold your hand up and point your finger to the sky in front of your face. Now open and close left eye then right eye a couple of times. Notice the position of your finger moves. This is basically what we are trying to do with the camera and eliminate that movement) When you move the angle the camera during rotation keep adjusting and looking at the posts until they stay in position. I find that a push pull trick with the upper plate helps and then tighten off the screw. This can take a few attempts so don’t get too flustered.

AX3C4988

 

With these basic steps complete the next step is upload the jpeg images and import into Photoshop (File, Automate, Photomerge) Auto and Press OK.

At this stage this will determine a clean stitch with all the photographs taken showing either an error or successful merger.

(Other software is photographing Spherical Panoramics I recommend PTGui)

Future video on YouTube in the works for further help.

 

 

Regards,

[•] p 🔺 z r 🔺 h n

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Fujifilm GFX 50s RAW Edit Workflow

This process is for those who don’t use Adobe Creative Cloud CC and can’t view the RAW .RAF file. Here are a few Free workarounds to edit your GFX 50s Photographs.

After taking your photograph in RAW and unfortunately for many of us the workflow has added an extra step with the RAF File (.RAF) as it must be converted into a workable file for Lightroom or Photoshop.

Option 1:

Here is an example of the workflow:

  1. Take Photograph
  2. Place the captured files into your desired folders on computer. (i.e RAW Photographs Folder)
  3. Run the DNG Converter Program.
  4. Click Extract button – Select file source RAF File (.RAF) and Select a desired output folder (i.e Photographs Folder)
  5. Click Convert run the process. (New files are placed in file folder ready to edit in Lightroom and Photoshop/Bridge.

DNG Converter

The conversion of RAW original straight out of the camera will now be a DNG File (.dng) and look something like this in the folder: DSCF1000

The Adobe DNG converter can be Downloaded from here:

PC: http://supportdownloads.adobe.com/product.jsp?product=106&platform=Windows

Mac: http://supportdownloads.adobe.com/product.jsp?product=106&platform=Macintosh

Make sure you download the current version to ensure that the program has the camera you are shooting with.

Option 2:

RAW FILE CONVERTER EX 2.0 powered by SILKYPIX (Ver.4.2.6.0) Installer for Windows

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/digital_cameras/software/myfinepix_studio/rfc/

Screenshot (8)

Screenshot (9)

Fujifilm Raw Conversion with Silkypix Software.
32.9MB File with a small crop. The Orginal was 45.7MB.

Saved with basic editing. See the adjacent screen shots in flickr stream. <—–

1.) Run Silkypix Software on PC or Mac
2.) Open Raw file (Photograph)
3.) Change view and Ctrl + will zoom in to desired viewing for edit.
4.) I added a little Strong Contrast and increased Saturation to 1.5 to make the green pop. Colour Mode was changed to Film Simulation, And Last Film Simulation to: Velvia/Vivid.
5.) File, One Scene Development.
6.) Basic Settings Choose JEPG and the JEPG Compressed to drop down to: The Highest Quality; EXIF Non Conforming. And Click Development(S) Button.

Well Done you now have a finished edited Jpeg ready to share to the world.

[•] Old Helensburgh Metropolitan Railway tunnel.

If conversion is done with Adobe DNG converter the .dng file is larger at 129MB then when edited in Photoshop produced a 29.3MB Jepg.

Option 3: 

Iridient X-Transformer – A high quality Fujifilm RAF to DNG image converter.

Iridient X-Transformer 1.0 beta 3 Software At this stage it is Beta version. I have tested this software and has performed slightly less than Adobes version. If it was a better program I would be interested but because of the short comings could not justify spending $43.59 on more software.

http://www.iridientdigital.com/

Best RAW Converter Results

Adobe RAW converter produces a nicer look to the image compared to the others . 100% crop looks the cleanest in my book. I personally prefer Adobe DNG Converter for the results and the workflow. Adobe has performed better results. The Silkypix RAW Converter is a softer image once converted and too soft for my liking. The Iridient X-Transformer Converter is the lessor performer of all three and I wasn’t a fan of the result.

It will be important to work out what your preferred file conversion is from RAW to Jpeg is minimize the storage of files on Hard Drive.

Regards,

[•] p 🔺 z r 🔺 h n

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[•] Is it time to let go?

Canon 5DIII

Is it time to let go of the Canon 5D Mark III and move to medium format?

Digital camera’s have come along way since 2005 and with 2017 being a new year, this year is really the new era of medium format. The question I have to ask “is now the time to move to medium format”?.

A special camera recently caught my attention and to call it out as it is a little shy is the new Fujifilm GFX 50s. I’ve heard one photographer say “it made him cry” when he took the images and looked at them in Lightroom. To me that’s a big statement and to the few that have been fortunate to test the camera with what I perceive as “little to no experience” to then rave about the performance. But what really grabs my attention is the new direction of medium format. There are two stand outs out there and they are the Hasselbald X1D and Fujifilm GFX 50s.. Both look beautiful and more people tend to praise the X1D but for me the GFX 50s stands out with the old school design with all the functions in the physical form.

Shutter and ISO function on body and the winner for me the Aperture on the lens. To me this is the best way to have a functioning camera. And this all comes down to how much digital functions do we really need in a camera? The more digital design in a camera opens it up to being more prone to failure (I witnessed one photographer turn his X1D on and off to get it to work which made me cringe.. Over 10K for a camera ouch). I woke up a long time ago for the need of camera’s to be more mechanical and less digital in design. I’ve had my very own Canon 24-105mm fail in the electronic aperture.. This is where I now look for and use lenses with mechanical aperture.. You’ll see I even prefer adjusting this manually and have purchased many lenses with this feature..

This is going to be a long talk I can feel it in my bones. My film camera’s still work beautifully and if they need a CLA it can be easily done. But not my digital camera’s like the 5DIII to repair you look at the cost and its on average the third of a new camera purchase price for repair. I like what Hasselblad has done with the X1D but I feel like its a “less is more” camera and the GFX 50s a “Put your money where your mouth is” camera.

I’ve been dwelling on this for many years taken thousands of photographs and think its the right time to take my photography into a different and new direction. A move to Fujifilm would be a more than a personal reason and I don’t think many would understand. I don’t even want another camera or another lens I just want the satisfaction knowing that everytime I take the next photograph that I produce the best work that will be sustained many years down the road.

The future of photography is here now and many photographers don’t even know it.

Fujifilm if your listening where can a photographer get a complete package A promotional GFX 50s kit with lens and a Fujifilm bag to compliment the kit? You have made something special can we do this?

Regards,

[•] p 🔺 z r 🔺 h n

 

 

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